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First Lso-positive potato psyllid in Idaho during 2014

Potato     
July 23, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

We have confirmed within our monitoring network our first liberibacter-positive potato psyllid in Idaho. The psyllid was collected last week from a yellow sticky card in a potato field in Canyon County. Liberibacter (Lso) is the bacterium that causes zebra chip disease. This positive psyllid and other data from the monitoring program will be incorporated before the end of the week into the online spreadsheets available at the links below. Now is the time to step up local monitoring and management programs in the area.

Results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 
 

corn earworm

Corn     Treasure Valley - All
Canyon county, Idaho
July 23, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

I am collaborating with Charter Seed Co. and Crookham Seed Co. on a project to trap corn earworm moths. We set out 7 traps in corn fields at various locations from near Melba to near Wilder. I am checking the traps every few days and posting the moth counts to this website.

Below are the moth counts from this week.
Location 7/23

caldwell area 0
melba area 0
north of lake lowell 0
west of greenleaf 0
east of wilder 0
west of wilder 0
north of homedale 0

More information...
 
 

corn earworm

     Treasure Valley - All
Canyon county, Idaho
July 21, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

The University of Idaho CIS 366 entitled “Timing Corn Earworm Control,” states that summer CEW moths will begin laying eggs in fresh corn silk at approximately 1300 growing degree days (GDD). Egg hatch and larvae attack will begin about 73 GDD later.

According to the Oregon State University GDD model for Corn Earworm (http://uspest.org/cgi-bin/ddmodel.pl?clm), we are currently at 1219 GDD in the Caldwell area and 1327 in the Parma area. We will hit 1300 GDD in the Caldwell area on approximately 7/25. Those fields with fresh silk at approximately 1373 GDD are most vulnerable to attack from corn earworm larvae. We will hit 1373 in the Caldwell area about 7/25 and 1373 in the Parma area about 7/23.

The following information was taken from CIS 366 regarding corn earworm.

Corn can be “scouted” for corn earworm eggs to predict possible infestation levels. Examine 10 silk masses (about 2-day old) on each edge of a field but only in those fields which are beginning to silk or are silking. Examining a field in late silk for the first time is worthless; most of the eggs, if any were present, are already hatched, and the damage cannot be prevented.

When the egg counts average 1 egg per 2 silk masses, about 100% ear infestation will occur in the field and other fields of like maturity in the vicinity. With 1 egg per 2 silk masses, about 1 inch of each ear tip will be damaged; 1 egg per silk mass will result in about 2 inches of the ear tip damage, etc. When the days and nights are warmer than usual, the damage may double because the earworm will develop faster than the corn.

Fields should be scouted about every 2 to 4 days, depending on temperatures. Once economic egg levels are reached, determined on the basis of damage expected, further scouting is unnecessary. All fields which silk after that time in that vicinity will be subject to damage.

No chemical control will control worms in the ears, so sprays must be timed to control the larvae on the silk before the worms enter the ears. Make the first application when the plants are 50 percent silk, and repeat in 5 to 7 days or as necessary.

I am once again collaborating with Charter Seed Company and Crookham Company on a project to trap corn earworm moths at several locations in the Treasure Valley. We set out 7 traps at various locations from near Melba to near Wilder. I will check the traps every few days and post the moth counts to this website. Purdue University recommends a treatment threshold of 10 moths per trap per night.

For CEW control information from the 2014 Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook click on the links below for the type of corn you are growing.

Click on the link(s) below for more information about this pest:

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potato psyllid and ZC update

Potato     
July 18, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

We have observed a notable increase in the number of psyllids captured in our monitoring program this week relative to previous weeks this year (though still much lower than toward the end of the last two seasons). Psyllids were found on sticky traps in two potato fields in Canyon County, two fields in Elmore County, three fields in Twin Falls County, and two fields in Jerome County. In addition, this week we found potato psyllids on sticky cards deployed near bittersweet nightshade plants at two sites in Twin Falls County. These psyllids are currently being tested or are on their way to being tested for liberibacter (Lso, the bacterium that causes zebra chip). All psyllids collected so far this year have been negative for Lso. Some sticky cards from last week were just returned to our lab early this week and were also found to have potato psyllids (one psyllid from a field in Twin Falls County and two psyllids from a field in Jerome County); these psyllids are currently being tested for Lso.

Online spreadsheets with detailed results of psyllid captures are available at the links below. These are updated periodically over the week as data come into our lab.

Results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 
 

ODA Emergency Rule on Imidacloprid and Dinotefuran Use on Li

Announcements     Treasure Valley - Oregon
July 11, 2014 by Stuart Reitz

On June 26, 2014, the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) enacted an emergency(temporary) rule prohibiting the use of any product containing the neonicotinoid insecticides dinotefuran or imidacloprid, regardless of application method, on linden trees.

The Temporary Administrative Rule will be in effect June 26 - December 23, 2014, OAR 603-057-0387.

Additional regulatory action may take place before or after the expiration date of the temporary
rule.

What Does this Mean to You?
This means that if you have a container label that provides directions for use on linden trees, you can not apply it to linden trees, basswood trees or other Tilia species.

This rule prohibits the use of dinotefuran or imidacloprid to Tilia spp., regardless of application method, including but not limited to: foliar, bark treatment, soil drench, tree or soil injection, bark injection, and basal bark application.

Click on the link(s) below for more information about this pest:

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potato psyllid and ZC update

Potato     
July 11, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

Three potato psyllids were found this week in University of Idaho’s potato psyllid monitoring program. One psyllid was found for the first time at the Kimberly Research & Extension Center (Twin Falls County) in a vacuum sample from our insecticide trial plots. Two additional psyllids (one per field) were found in potato fields in Twin Falls and Jerome Counties on sticky traps. These psyllids are on their way to be tested for liberibacter (Lso, the bacterium that causes zebra chip). All psyllids collected so far this year have been negative for Lso. Some sticky cards have yet to be returned to our lab; results from those sites will be posted early next week.



We still encourage monitoring of potato psyllids, and insecticide programs should be prepared.



Online spreadsheets with detailed results of psyllid captures are available at the links below. These are updated periodically over the week as data come into our lab.



Results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:



https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0



Results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0



More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.



http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 
 

sugarbeet pests

Sugarbeets     Treasure Valley - All
Owyhee county, Idaho
July 11, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

Powdery mildew has been found by Amalgamated Sugar Company Field Consultants in the Grandview, Idaho area. In addition, Black Bean Aphids have been found in sugarbeet fields in the Grandview and Nampa, Idaho areas. If Black Bean Aphids are found in your fields at a level requiring treatment, you can include an insecticide treatment for Black Bean Aphid in the mildew tank mix. Contact your Amalgamated Field Consultant for information regarding treatment recommendations.

More information...
 



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This website utilizes a network of growers around the Pacific Northwest. As information about pest infestations becomes available, registered users will receive updates pertaining to the specific crops that they may be growing at the time.