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Potato Late Blight Continues to Spread

Potato     
August 22, 2014 by Phil Nolte


Two fields with late blight in Fremont County were confirmed today. There are multiple late blight fields in Madison, Bingham, Bonneville and Power Counties. The current recommendation is if anyone in the affected counties has not applied a protectant fungicide to their potato fields do so immediately. Until vine kill the University of Idaho recommends that potato fields be kept on a 7 day spray schedule. Rain is predicted to continue in all of the current late blight infected counties and rain is very efficient at moving late blight spore around. .

It is essential to protect green, growing vines with fungicide applications. Spores of the late blight pathogen are washed from the foliage into the soil causing tubers to become infected. Sometimes tuber infection can occur with very little foliar late blight. Protecting the foliage of Ranger Russet fields is particularly important because the vines remain green longer and the tubers are highly susceptible to tuber infection.

If late blight is present in your field, we recommend a post-harvest application of a phosphorous acid (phosphite) product going into storage at the rate of 12.8 fl oz/ton applied at a volume of 0.5 gal/ton of potatoes. Ensure you are not over-applying which may add too much water to the harvested potatoes. Potatoes should NOT be shiny wet, but rather barely damp. Apply at a point in the handling process where potatoes are rotating or dropping to ensure the best coverage. These post-harvest products will not cure infected tubers but will protect healthy tubers form becoming infected in storage.

Please bring any suspicious samples in to the University of Idaho or Miller Research for positive identification.

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Idaho Psyllid Monitoring Update

Potato     
August 22, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

Potato psyllid captures in our monitoring program slightly increased this week in terms of numbers (but remain relatively low compared to previous monitoring years) and locations (Magic and Treasure Valleys). Psyllids were found on sticky traps in commercial potato fields in Owyhee, Canyon, Ada, Elmore, and Twin Falls Counties.
None of the psyllids found so far in commercial fields (except for one on Canyon County during mid-July) has tested positive for Lso (liberibacter; the bacterium that causes zebra chip).


Detailed results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:


https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0


Detailed results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:


https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0



More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.



http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

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Late blight in Idaho

Potato     
August 20, 2014 by Phil Nolte

An additional potato field in Madison County has been confirmed with late blight.

Previously, late blight had been confirmed in Power County, Bonneville County, and Bingham County. The current recommendation from the University of Idaho is for everyone to apply a protectant fungicide immediately. The rain showers we have been experiencing lately provide perfect conditions for late blight to spread. Please remember that late blight also has the ability to infect tubers growing in the ground as spores move from the plants into the soil. Stay on a 7 day spray schedule and continue to scout fields carefully. Please bring any suspicious samples in to the University of Idaho or Miller Research for positive identification.

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Sprout damage in grain

     
August 19, 2014 by Juliet Marshall

Guidance to Idaho malting barley producers experiencing higher than acceptable sprout damage in their 2014 malting barley crop

Growers are urged to be patient and not panic as they try to complete their 2014 growing season. We recommend producers follow these steps:
1. Follow best management harvesting practices, particularly avoid harvesting lodged barley. Beware that injured by sprout barley is more fragile and more susceptible to skinned and broken kernels.
2. Quickly harvest the remaining grain to prevent growth of molds. Sooty molds will increase off flavors in malt and reduce suitability for feed.
3. Store your barley with good aeration. Grain is stored best if it is cool, dry and clean. The recommended maximum moisture content for storage of clean sound barley during warm summer temperatures is 12%. Barley can be stored at slightly higher moisture content if it is kept cool.
4. Take a good bin sample as your put your barley into storage and work with your malting barley company to have the barley tested for injured by sprout.
5. Be patient and give your malting company time to determine what portion of your crop can be used as malting.
6. Try to avoid dumping your barley as feed at harvest as the commercial feed barley prices have been dropping rapidly.
Your malting companies are going to extraordinary lengths to test Idaho malting barley that has been injured by sprout and to determine how much can be used for malting. They are researching and micro malting samples to determine the highest limit of sprout damage they can take without compromising the malting and brewing process.

It is important to understand why sprout damage poses a risk in the brewing process. Pre-harvest sprouting (PHS) or pre-germination impacts the ability of barley to germinate. Problems can range from a slow loss of germinative energy or capacity over time in storage to the complete loss of germination at the time of harvest. Barley used for malting must exhibit vigorous and uniform germination. In malting, pre-harvest sprouted barley can lead to poorly modified malt that is unsuitable for the production of beer. Low extract yields, poor beer stability and off-flavors are just a few of the problems that can result from PHS damaged barley.

Barley kernels remain resistant to sprouting prior to physiological maturity. Some varieties maintain a level of resistance (dormancy) for a significant time after harvest. Certain conditions like heavy rainfall at maturity can reduce this level of resistance to germination.

The bottom line is that barley with sprout damage, even if it germinates well after harvest, can lose germination rapidly in storage. There are no tests that can predict when a sudden drop in germination will occur. Even if a relatively high degree of germination remains in a lot of barley, the germination may be uneven with some kernels germinating much slower than others in that lot resulting in a malt that does not meet brewers minimum specifications for beer production.

Full documents at: http://www.uidaho.edu/extension/cereals/scseidaho

For more information, please contact Kelly Olson, Idaho Barley Commission Boise office 208-334-2090, cell 208-409-9165 or our Idaho Falls satellite office, cell 208-569-6957. Dr. Juliet Marshall, University of Idaho, Idaho Falls, 208-529-8376, cell 208-390-4859.

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Additional confirmed late blight fields

Potato     
August 15, 2014 by Nora Olsen

Late blight has been positively confirmed in Idaho. Today one field has been confirmed in Power County and one field in Bonneville County. There are a total of three confirmed late blight fields in Bingham County. The current recommendation from the University of Idaho is for everyone to apply a protectant fungicide immediately. The rain showers we have been experiencing lately provide perfect conditions for late blight to spread. Please remember that late blight also has the ability to infect tubers growing in the ground as spores move from the plants into the soil. A quick reminder, tomatoes in home gardens are also susceptible to late blight infections. Stay on a 7 day spray schedule and continue to scout fields carefully. Please bring any suspicious samples in to the University of Idaho for positive identification.

More information...
 
 

potato psyllid update

Potato     
August 15, 2014 by Erik Wenninger

Potato psyllid captures in our monitoring program were similar to recent weeks in terms of numbers (relatively low) and locations (Magic and Treasure Valleys). Psyllids were found on sticky traps in commercial potato fields in Canyon, Ada, Jerome, and Twin Falls Counties. This represents the first potato psyllid captured in Ada County in our monitoring network this year. We also captured four psyllids in vacuum samples at bittersweet nightshade sites in Twin Falls County.

None of the psyllids found so far in commercial fields (except for one on Canyon County during mid-July) has tested positive for Lso (liberibacter; the bacterium that causes zebra chip).

Detailed results for the “intense” fields, which are monitored with 10 sticky traps, vacuum samples, and leaf samples are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdG15WTNRMkEteHRWRGhpM2ltSXBiR3c#gid=0

Detailed results for the “light” fields, which are monitored with 4 sticky traps are here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AuZRwfbNUs2YdGVrX2t2NGs0YzlYYUZaQkNaejhES2c#gid=0

More information and resources on potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, can be found at the link below.

http://extension.uidaho.edu/kimberly/tag/potato-psyllid-and-zebra-chip/

More information...
 
 

Malheur Experiment Station Onion Variety Day

Onion     Treasure Valley - All
August 15, 2014 by Stuart Reitz

You are invited to the Malheur Experiment Station Onion Variety Day presented by the OSU Malheur Experiment Station. The Variety day will be Tuesday August 26, 2014 from 9 AM to 1 PM.

At 10 AM there will be an overview of research trials related to E. coli bacteria in irrigation water and the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Complimentary lunch will be served. Please reserve lunch by calling Janet Jones at the Malheur Experiment Station, 595 Onion Ave., Ontario OR 97914, (541) 889-2174.

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Farming with Pollinators and Beneficial Insects Field Day

     
August 14, 2014 by Jennifer Miller

For Immediate Release
August 14, 2014

Contact:
Jennifer Miller, 208-850-6504, Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides

Farming with Pollinators and Beneficial Insects Field Day

The Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides invites farmers interested in increasing pollinator and beneficial insect habitat on their farms to attend a Wednesday, September 3 field day.

Clay and Josie Erskine of Peaceful Belly Farm, located in the Dry Creek Valley north of Boise, will host the field day from 9 am – 12:30 pm.

The Erskines will show how they have incorporated pollinator and beneficial insect habitat on their farm by planting willows in a riparian area, native bunch grasses and clover on farm roads, perennials into a hedgerow, and the management of successive plantings of brassicas to flowering.

Jessa Kay Cruz, senior pollinator conservation specialist with the Xerces Society, will present her work with farmers to establish habitat for pollinators and beneficial insects in irrigated cropping systems. She will cover how to assess existing habitat and identify areas to improve, year-round beneficial insect and pollinator habitat requirements, and certified organic methods of site prep for establishing habitat.

Copies of the Xerces Society’s new book Farming with Native Beneficial Insects: Ecological Pest Control Solutions will be available to review or purchase.

The field day will conclude with a farm lunch and discussion of funding opportunities, including a new microloan program through Farm Service Agency and conservation funding through Natural Resources Conservation Service.

The cost is $15 and pre-registration is required. Register online at www.pesticide.org or contact Jen Miller (jmiller@pesticide.org or 208-850-6504) by August 27. Details at www.pesticide.org.

This tour is made possible by support from USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Conservation Innovation Grant, USDA Risk Management Agency Education partnership funding, and University of Idaho Canyon County. This is an equal opportunity event.

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Late blight in potatoes - Bingham County

Potato     
August 12, 2014 by Phil Nolte

Late blight has been positively confirmed in Idaho. Today a potato leaf sample was brought into the University of Idaho for identification with sporulating lesions. The sample was from Bingham County. The current recommendation from the University of Idaho is to apply a protectant fungicide immediately. With more rain in the forecast for the rest of the week in this area it is important to spray and scout field thoroughly for symptoms. Please bring any suspicious samples in to the University of Idaho for positive identification.

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corn earworm

Corn     Treasure Valley - All
Canyon county, Idaho
August 12, 2014 by Jerry Neufeld

Here is my count of corn earworm moths as of this morning.

Location 7/23 7/29 4-Aug 12-Aug

caldwell area 0 0 0 0
melba area 0 0 0 0
north of lake lowell 0 0 0 7
west of greenleaf 0 0 0 8
east of wilder 0 0 0 3
west of wilder 0 0 0 0
north of homedale 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 19

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What is the Pacific Northwest Pest Alert Network?

This website utilizes a network of growers around the Pacific Northwest. As information about pest infestations becomes available, registered users will receive updates pertaining to the specific crops that they may be growing at the time.